Tag Archives: Wikisource

But I Can’t Cite It?

Students have a secret– something that lurks in the shadows, a spectre that haunts all of our papers. Deny it all you want, but the truth remains . . . we use Wikipedia. We don’t care. We love it. We … Continue reading

Posted in reading, social media, The Blog | Tagged , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction

Like some of my classmates, I have had a number of serious questions about the arbitrariness of our Wikisource annotations. Based on the lack of definitive guidelines that Wikisource offers to contributors, it is pretty safe to suggest there’s a … Continue reading

Posted in Week 10: Second reflection on the Social Edition and Wikisource | Tagged , , , | Leave a comment

Authorship and Incentives

Reading through posts on “Authorship” this week had me questioning authorship and incentives, which, in turn, made me think of Wikisource. As we have already discussed, Wikisource encourages a mentality that focuses on 1) the non-permanency of texts 2) the … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized, Week 6: Authorship, Week 7: Authorship | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Text, Wiki, Hypermedia and…Icebergs?

Ed Folsom, in his article, discusses databases, but his argument fits more comfortably within the hypertext debate.  Interestingly, as George P. Landow explains, “[h]ypertextuality, like all digital textuality, inevitably includes a far higher percentage of nonverbal information than does print.”  … Continue reading

Posted in Week 4: Text, Wikisource, Wikimedia, WWW | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , | Leave a comment

A Brave New World: The New Semiotics of the WWW

I just finished validating a classmate’s proofreads on our Wikisource page. As I was working, I found myself wondering how all the {{}} and ‘’’’ and |’s of markup language impact the original text, if at all. Does mechanical language … Continue reading

Posted in Week 4: Text, Wikisource, Wikimedia, WWW | Tagged , , , , , , , | 3 Comments

Is existing simultaneously an option? Wikisource AND the library

This week I found myself searching for inspiration to write this blog post. Despite reading over my colleagues’ posts and reviewing the class readings again, I still struggled to find a particular subject that caught my interest. The main reason … Continue reading

Posted in Week 3: Wikisource vs the Library | Tagged , | 4 Comments

Wikisource vs. the Library

It is hard to pick a side when both the library and Wikisource, in essence, work to accomplish the same noble goals: to disseminate and preserve information. Both have limitations and benefits, as Puneet illustrates in her blog entry. While the … Continue reading

Posted in Week 3: Wikisource vs the Library | Tagged , | 5 Comments

The Social Edition: Old and New Not Necessarily Something Blue

The social edition—combining social media, scholarly production and the “electronic form”–for example The Devonshire Manuscript—sits among the same chaos, uncertainty and ineffective censoring plaguing all of the world wide web. Ray Siemens et al. in “Toward modeling the social edition: … Continue reading

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And So Our Social Experiment Begins: The Difficulties of Editing Socially

This week we have started our adventures in social editing with the first series of blog posts and an introduction to Wikisource. For those readers who might be confused about what exactly we, as a class of graduate students, are … Continue reading

Posted in Week 2: Initial reflection on the Social Edition | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Reading the Social

I think that Miso has tapped into something significant with her blog post. She poses a number of questions that are intertwined with their concerns about the future of expertise, scholarship, and credit when faced with a community of wiki … Continue reading

Posted in Week 2: Initial reflection on the Social Edition | Tagged , , | 2 Comments