Tag Archives: The Social Edition

But I Can’t Cite It?

Students have a secret– something that lurks in the shadows, a spectre that haunts all of our papers. Deny it all you want, but the truth remains . . . we use Wikipedia. We don’t care. We love it. We … Continue reading

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(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction

Like some of my classmates, I have had a number of serious questions about the arbitrariness of our Wikisource annotations. Based on the lack of definitive guidelines that Wikisource offers to contributors, it is pretty safe to suggest there’s a … Continue reading

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The Social Edition: Old and New Not Necessarily Something Blue

The social edition—combining social media, scholarly production and the “electronic form”–for example The Devonshire Manuscript—sits among the same chaos, uncertainty and ineffective censoring plaguing all of the world wide web. Ray Siemens et al. in “Toward modeling the social edition: … Continue reading

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On The Social Edition and The Devonshire Manuscript: Margaret

  In Pertinent Discussions Toward Modeling the Social Edition: Annotated Bibliographies Ray Siemens says that “the next steps in the scholarly edition’s development in its incorporation of social media functionality reflect the importance of traditional humanistic activities and workflows, and include collaboration, … Continue reading

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Julie’s Response to “Toward Modeling the Social Edition: An Approach to Understanding the Electronic Scholarly Edition in the Context of New and Emerging Social Media”

In the above article Ray Siemens explores the tensions between the traditional scholarly edition and the social edition, particularly highlighting changes in the role of the editor, and the expansive nature of the social edition. In terms of engaging with … Continue reading

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