Category Archives: Week 7: Authorship

How Keen Am I on Andrew Keen? Not Very…

I have to admit my opinion of Andrew Keen was coloured before reading the first few chapters of The Cult of the Amateur. I met his less than optimistic musings in the June 2013 issue of The Atlantic, when he … Continue reading

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Solitary Genius

Authorship in digital humanities brings to light just how wrong Roland Barthes was in his essay “The Death of the Author”.  I would argue the title should be “The Death of the Engaging Third Person Omniscient Narrator”, but that is … Continue reading

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Authorship

It seems that our discussions this term have been born from the tensions between print vs. digital, single authorship vs. collaborative authorship, and the traditional, visible print editor vs. the more or less invisible community of digital editors/curators. We have … Continue reading

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Digital Idealism, Social Regulation and Our Textual Heritage via Deegan & Sutherland

In our reflections on a variety of manifestations of digital publishing over the past few months, many of us have expressed concern about the political and social implications of the digital projects we explore. In particular, I’m thinking back to … Continue reading

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The curator: A new ship to sail

The readings of the past few weeks have been challenging us to consider the robustness of authority as a concept. More importantly, we have been asked to question whether this concept that helps us understand the writing processes that lead … Continue reading

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The Critic as Artist?

After reading the chapter on “Authorship” of Kathleen Fitzpatrick’s Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy (in which she discusses similar ideas to her talk given at the MLA 2013 Conference, seen here), I was struck by the idea that … Continue reading

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Authorship and the Humanities

After attending the Humanities presentation Thursday, I made a few odd connections in my head between the discussion that ensued in the presentation and our discussion in class last Monday. In class Monday, we discussed (in regards to the nature … Continue reading

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Authorship and Incentives

Reading through posts on “Authorship” this week had me questioning authorship and incentives, which, in turn, made me think of Wikisource. As we have already discussed, Wikisource encourages a mentality that focuses on 1) the non-permanency of texts 2) the … Continue reading

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MLA 2013: Open Review and Open Scholarship (Kathleen Fitzpatrick)

In case you are new to our blog, and do not want to read Kathleen Fitzpatrick’s article that is being discussed, here is her keynote address from the 2013 MLA conference on the same topic. Enjoy! *I am unable to … Continue reading

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Writing as an Industry: Is the Author Really Dead?

As Michelle and Julie have pointed out, Kathleen Fitzpatrick discusses the identity and purpose of the writer in her chapter entitled “Authorship.” For me, the concept of “authorship” got totally flipped on its head once I read Roland Barthes’ “The … Continue reading

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