Monthly Archives: March 2014

How Keen Am I on Andrew Keen? Not Very…

I have to admit my opinion of Andrew Keen was coloured before reading the first few chapters of The Cult of the Amateur. I met his less than optimistic musings in the June 2013 issue of The Atlantic, when he … Continue reading

Posted in Week 7: Authorship, Week 8: Editing and Remixing | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments

Blurring the lines: the amateur vs. The Expert

Sasha’s post makes some great points about the ways in which the internet can serve to democratise art and culture. In his book The Cult of the Amateur: how blogs, MySpace, YouTube, and the rest of today’s user-generated media are … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized, Week 8: Editing and Remixing | 3 Comments

Solitary Genius

Authorship in digital humanities brings to light just how wrong Roland Barthes was in his essay “The Death of the Author”.  I would argue the title should be “The Death of the Engaging Third Person Omniscient Narrator”, but that is … Continue reading

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Remixing and the Discovery of “Gizoogle”

“What the heck is Gizoogle?!” Is the question I asked my roommate when he mentioned it. If you haven’t discovered it yet, prepare to be amazed and enthralled. A variation of Google, Gizoogle acts as a search engine… only in … Continue reading

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John Oliver Hobbes as remixer (aka I think we’re still talking about remixing)

We’re basically talking about how old people are wrong week to week. Specifically how they are wrong with new media in relation to academia now. Not seeing the possibilities that new media can offer for academia but rather how academia … Continue reading

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Editing and Authorial Intention

Much like Laura and Olivia, I think our attention in the past few weeks has shifted from aiming to preserve the textual elements of the print version of The Tales of John Oliver Hobbes to making the digital version as … Continue reading

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When editing is all about the reader

Similar, to Olivia, this week’s discussion topic got me thinking about how editing The Tales of John Oliver Hobbes on wikisource has shifted our focus from the text to the reader. Applying Shillingsburg’s article on authority and editing to our … Continue reading

Posted in Week 8: Editing and Remixing | 3 Comments

Authorship

It seems that our discussions this term have been born from the tensions between print vs. digital, single authorship vs. collaborative authorship, and the traditional, visible print editor vs. the more or less invisible community of digital editors/curators. We have … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized, Week 6: Authorship, Week 7: Authorship | 5 Comments

Readability versus Preservation – A Debate in Digitization

Maintaining textual integrity is supposedly a foundational aspect of editing, but this does not always appear to hold true when creating digital editions. By textual integrity I mean maintaining not only the content of the work, but also the formatting … Continue reading

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Digital Idealism, Social Regulation and Our Textual Heritage via Deegan & Sutherland

In our reflections on a variety of manifestations of digital publishing over the past few months, many of us have expressed concern about the political and social implications of the digital projects we explore. In particular, I’m thinking back to … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized, Week 7: Authorship, Week 8: Editing and Remixing | Tagged , , , , | 2 Comments