Monthly Archives: March 2014

To read JOH is to love JOH

I might be setting myself up for some backlash here, but I never used to be a huge Jane Austen fan. I signed up for a course on 18th century literature in my fourth year of undergrad, and the professor … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized, Week 9: Reflection on John Oliver Hobbes and her work | Leave a comment

The Fallacy of Completion in the Digital Edition

I “finished” my Wikisource annotations about 10 days ago. As I was writing the “last” annotation, I remember thinking two things: 1) Wow that was way more work than I initially realized. 2) My sense of completion on this project … Continue reading

Posted in Week 10: Second reflection on the Social Edition and Wikisource | 4 Comments

Hobbes and her Self-Concious Reflections

While reading The Tales of John Oliver Hobbes and in particular Some Emotions and a Moral I was astounded by Hobbes’ wit. Her writing is both humorous and layered with meaning. For this reason, Hobbes’ book was ideal to annotate; … Continue reading

Posted in Week 10: Second reflection on the Social Edition and Wikisource | 2 Comments

Too Much of One Thing…

I watched a lot of television growing up. As Lawrence Lessig points out, “the average TV is left on for 8.5 hours a day” and “the average American watches that average TV for about 4.5 hours a day” (Lessig 68). … Continue reading

Posted in The Blog, Uncategorized, Week 8: Editing and Remixing | 4 Comments

Five Reasons You Should Read John Oliver Hobbes

This blog has been a reflection on the creation of Social Edition of The Tales of John Oliver Hobbes and has focused broadly on digitization in the Humanities. This week we focus on John Oliver Hobbes and her work. This list … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized, Week 9: Reflection on John Oliver Hobbes and her work | Tagged , , , , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Between annotation and John Oliver Hobbes

When it comes to annotation and critical editions, I am a relative outsider to the genre. In my entire life, the only example of this type of project that I’ve read was a critical edition of Anne Frank’s diary. I … Continue reading

Posted in Week 9: Reflection on John Oliver Hobbes and her work | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The votes are in … and … Shakespeare’s the Man!

Marge’s post nicely opens up the discussion of remixing classic novels by focusing on Clueless, a rendition of Jane Austen’s Emma and discusses the creativity and originality needed in such renditions. A lot of the best movies of our generation are remixes of classic novels and plays … Continue reading

Posted in The Blog, Uncategorized, Week 8: Editing and Remixing | 4 Comments

Social edition article on Wikipedia

I just started the article Social edition on Wikipedia so that we can include it as part of the introduction to our own social edition. Currently there’s a number of areas that need attention. Can anyone help out? A more … Continue reading

Posted in social media | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Is the “cult of the amateur” really that bad…?

Like Sydney and Julie have expressed in their posts this week, I too was off put by Keen’s negative perspective on the Internet in his book The Cult of the Amateur: How Today’s Internet is Killing Our Culture. As Julie has … Continue reading

Posted in Uncategorized | 3 Comments

Remixing . . . is the BEST!

It’s true. How many times is a remixed version of a song been better than the original? Don’t we all love hearing samples of old songs in hip-hop? I remember listening to Janet Jackson’s Someone to Call My Lover and thinking … Continue reading

Posted in Week 8: Editing and Remixing | Tagged , , , , | 3 Comments