Monthly Archives: January 2014

And So Our Social Experiment Begins: The Difficulties of Editing Socially

This week we have started our adventures in social editing with the first series of blog posts and an introduction to Wikisource. For those readers who might be confused about what exactly we, as a class of graduate students, are … Continue reading

Posted in Week 2: Initial reflection on the Social Edition | Tagged , , , , | 1 Comment

Education and the Digital Humanities Community

In response to our introduction to digital humanities, our class has expressed shared concerns regarding the social edition, including a desire to preserve and protect the roles of editors, experts, material texts, and close reading skills as valued parts of … Continue reading

Posted in Week 2: Initial reflection on the Social Edition | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

The Social Edition and the Reader

Our introduction to digital humanities began with a discussion of early forms of digitization, namely the shortcomings of microfilm and early electronic scholarly editions. Most of us had misgivings about the way digitization privileges content over materiality and may ignore … Continue reading

Posted in Week 2: Initial reflection on the Social Edition | 1 Comment

The Limits of a Social Edition

While reading “Toward Modeling the Social Edition: An Approach to Understanding the Electronic Scholarly Edition in the Context of New and Emerging Social Media” I was primarily interested in how social editions facilitate a new kind of reading and change … Continue reading

Posted in Week 2: Initial reflection on the Social Edition | 2 Comments

The Best of Times and the Blurst of Times: The Social Edition

The Social Edition, at least my impression of it, is like a thousand monkeys typing randomly until they produce the works of Shakespeare. We are working from the text already and we have to just transcribe the edition, but we … Continue reading

Posted in Week 2: Initial reflection on the Social Edition | 3 Comments

Reading the Social

I think that Miso has tapped into something significant with her blog post. She poses a number of questions that are intertwined with their concerns about the future of expertise, scholarship, and credit when faced with a community of wiki … Continue reading

Posted in Week 2: Initial reflection on the Social Edition | Tagged , , | 2 Comments

Process Vs. Product: The Credibility of The Social Edition, and the Lack of a Definitive End

The notion of the social edition is new to me. As I have had little experience with websites like that of Wikisource before, I came to the realization during our class time of how complex the process of formation for … Continue reading

Posted in Week 2: Initial reflection on the Social Edition | 4 Comments

Initial Reflection of the Social Edition

I’ve always preferred reading printed texts rather than digitized versions. When assigned readings from an online journal, I almost always print them out. Perhaps this apprehension contributed to my initial reaction to the Social Edition of the Devonshire Manuscript on … Continue reading

Posted in Week 2: Initial reflection on the Social Edition | 2 Comments

Who Writes a Social Edition?

Near the beginning of their article “Toward Modeling the Social Edition”, Siemens et al. note that “historically, the scholarly edition relied on […] the expertise of a single authority or editor at its helm – something almost immediately challenged by … Continue reading

Posted in Week 2: Initial reflection on the Social Edition | Tagged | 2 Comments

Initial Reflection on Social Edition

As I was reading the Siemens et. al. article “Toward Modeling the Social Edition…” I was initially struck by how much I take the internet and all of the information that it holds for granted. I’ve known for quite a … Continue reading

Posted in Week 2: Initial reflection on the Social Edition | Tagged | 8 Comments